2016 Stakeholder Survey Summary

February 3, 2017

 

2016 is our sixth annual stakeholder survey. The survey is conducted to offer our stakeholders the chance to provide both critical and positive feedback. In 2016 total of 82 responses were completed; a slight increase from the 72 response in 2015.  Overall, the responses were positive.

Stakeholder CategoryNumber of responses
Government Service8 (10%)
Federal Government Department4 (5%)
State Government Department4 (5%)
Local Council12 (16%)
University or Academic Researcher4 (5%)
Community Service or NGO36 (47%)
Corporate Partner or Foundations4 (5%)
Community or Sport or Service Club5 (7%)
Did not identify category5 (7%)
Total77 (100%)
Number of respondents who skilled the question5

 

The annual survey covers three main relationships the stakeholders have with Youth Off The Streets:

  • Funding Stakeholders
  • Service Provider Stakeholders
  • Partnership Stakeholders

Funding Stakeholders

There were 13 (17%) responses from stakeholders whose main relationship with Youth Off The Streets is as a funder. Funding relationships ranged from less than 12 months to over five years. 10 (77%) of the funding stakeholders indicated that they had a Memorandum of Understanding or contract with Youth Off The Streets.

Service Provider Stakeholders

There were 30 (40%) responses from stakeholders whose main relationship with Youth Off The Streets is as a service provider70% of the service providers identified as a Community Service or NGO. Service provider relationships ranged from less than 12 months to over 5 years.

8 (30%) of the service providers indicated that they had a Memorandum of Understanding or contract with Youth Off The Streets.

Partnership Stakeholders

There were 33 (43%) stakeholders who identified as working in partnership with Youth Off The Streets to deliver a service or program.  Respondents have been involved from less than 12 months to more than 5 years.  11 (33%) of the stakeholders working in partnership indicated that they had a Memorandum of Understanding or contract.

Stakeholder experiences with Youth Off The Streets

The majority of stakeholders reported that their experience of working with Youth Off The Streets as ‘Very good’ (43%) and ‘Good’ (53%), however three respondents (4%) indicated that their working relationship was ‘Poor’.   These mirrors the responses regarding how staff demonstrate our PRIDE values: ‘Very well’ was indicated by 22 respondents (27%) and ‘Well’ was indicated by 55 respondents (68%), and three (4%) stakeholders reported ‘Badly’.

Capture

Stakeholders were given the chance to make suggestions about what Youth Off The Streets could do to improve its relationship with them.

Suggestions included:

  • Ongoing engagement
  • Continue partnership focus
  • Support staffing arrangements of program facilitator
  • Stay committed to assisting with alternate education
  • Perhaps when there are policy changes within the organisation which may affect referral between services, let the other services know of those changes, e.g. the changed focus on local kids exclusively, for instance
  • They’re great at partnerships now and always ready to support and work together. They do AMAZING youth programs and are getting into great parenting programs. The only advice I’d have is possibility to get better at exploring what others in the area do a little but more
  • Attend meetings to discuss service
  • More communication
  • A bit more engagement

Stakeholders were given the chance to make suggestions about what Youth Off The Streets could do to improve outcomes for young people.

Suggestions included:

  • Think about the family or other adult relationships that would support the young person. How these relationships can be repaired, developed and fostered more.
  • Extend the individual case focus and commitment to multi-agency response.
  • Ask the young people what they want to do as a program and a budget is needed to run programs. Youth are commenting that they are not interested in free food they want programs that they are interested in e.g. graffiti art.
  • Keep listening to them and changing and evolving according to their feedback and insight.
  • Follow up case management/mentoring with identified young people after delivering a program would be great. Even short term support to help them link in with other services and continue to engage in support.
  • Continue to commit to existing clients. Broaden the reach of young people you have contact with (ie very disengaged people).

Parents, Carer and Guardian Survey

Twenty One (21) parents, carers and guardians participated in the 2016 annual survey. Of these 18 were female, 1 was males and 2 skipped the question. Overall, the responses were positive.

Their children had been involved in Youth Off The Streets through the food van, school, outreach, aftercare, Dunlea AOD programs, residential programs and aboriginal services. Some had been involved in several services.

They rated the quality of the support that their child had received as ‘very high’ (60%), ‘high’ (30%) and ‘average’ (10%), and the quality of support and programs they have used themselves as, ‘very high’ (76%), ‘high’ (19%), and ‘average’ (5%). All the respondents indicated they would recommend Youth Off The Streets to their family, friends and colleagues, and all said that the services and program were ‘better’ than other services their child has been involved with.

All the respondents indicated that they knew who to talk to at Youth Off The Streets if they had concerns about their child or themselves. Two respondents leaving comments:

  • The staff have been amazing. They have been very supportive and understanding. They have given my son a positive attitude towards life.
  • “Very very good. The long term services has been amazing, the services has not rejected me or my family and continued support no matter the circumstances.

Parents, carers and guardians were given the chance to make suggestions about how Youth Off The Streets could improve the way they work with parents.

  • I am gaining skills and information from the Dunlea services therefore I have no suggestion.
  • Keep up the great work & thank you for all your help with everything.
  • There are no suggestions for improvement, the team at YOTS are amazing.

Volunteer Survey Summary

In 2016 50 volunteers completed the survey. Overall, the responses were positive.

CategoryPercentage
Food Van19 (38%)
Street walk10 (20%)
In a school3 (6%)
At an Outreach4 (8%)
At Koch Centre for Youth1 (2%)
Mentoring11 (22%)
Merrylands Office1 (2%)
Don Bosco Home refuge5 (10%)

 

Food Van Volunteers

19 volunteers identified as volunteering at the Food van, 14 females, four male and one skipped the question, and 15 works full-time, with two part-time and one retired. The volunteers described their involvement as preparing food at Don Bosco and serving the food in Darlinghurst. Most of the volunteers who completed the survey have been involved with the food van for over two years, with 9 (50%) stating they have been involved for between two to five year and 7 (39%) for over 5 years.  All the respondents said they would recommend Youth Off The Streets as a good place to volunteer to family, friends or colleagues, and 5 (28%) ‘strongly agree’ or 12 (66%) ‘agree’ that Youth Off The Streets recognises and values their contributions. Food van volunteers indicated that they would be interested in participating in the further training, particularly in adolescent mental health, adolescent alcohol and other drugs, child protection, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness.

What volunteers said they liked the most about volunteering with Youth Off The Streets:

  • The sense of community, fulfilment and perspective that comes with volunteering every month.
  • I am putting food and drinks in the mouths that need it instantly. Also providing social contact with the homeless community. I love it!
  • Giving something back to those less fortunate. The comradery in the team I do it with.

Further thoughts, comments and suggestions included;

  •  Some of the conversations and situations we are exposed to at the food van can be emotionally taxing. Whilst I find it extraordinarily rewarding it would be great to receive some additional tips and support to deal with this which is foreign to many who are not constantly exposed to the reality of many in our community. The opportunity to debrief with others would also be helpful.
  • I have many friends who would like to be a part of the program. More information on recruitment nights would be great.

Street Walk Volunteers

10 of the volunteers identified as working with the Street Walk team, 4 (40%) females and 6 (60%) males. Nine (90%) work full-time and 1 (10%) is retired. The volunteers described what they did as helping kids on the street, getting them into accommodation, providing food and supporting their needs. Overall, 2 (40%) had been volunteering for 2-5 years, 2 (20%) less than six months, and 2 (20%) for 1-2 years, and 2 (20%) more than 5 years.  Nine (90%) of the volunteers indicated that they would recommend Youth Off The Streets to family, friend or colleagues and 1 (10%) said maybe. The Street Walk volunteers also indicated that they would like further training, particularly in adolescent mental health, adolescent alcohol and other drugs, child protection, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness.

What volunteers said they liked the most about volunteering with Youth Off The Streets:

  • The thing I like most about volunteering for youth off the streets is that I get involved by talking to the kids & helping the kids with their needs & wants.
  • I like how we support their needs in talking to them supplying them food or even driving them to their required safe environment base on what they need or want.
  • Interaction with people doing it tough. I learn a lot from it and also good to see those that have done well now older as [I have] been doing streetwalk since [it] began.

Mentoring

11 volunteers indicated that they were involved in mentoring in some capacity, either through a school or mentoring a scholarship holder. Of these volunteers, 9 were female and 1 male and 1 person skipped the question. The mentors described what they did as mentoring in the scholarship program, assisting students with classwork and assessments. The mentoring volunteers have been working with Youth Off The Streets, 4 (36%) 6 months – 1 year, 2 (18%) 1-2 years and 5 (46%) 2 – 5 years. 70% indicated that they would recommend Youth Off The Streets to family, friends or colleagues as a good place to volunteer and 30% said maybe. The mentoring volunteers also indicated that they would like further training, with all saying they would like to learn more about adolescent mental health and adolescent alcohol and other drugs.

What volunteers said they liked the most about volunteering with Youth Off The Streets:

  • Satisfaction when I see my mentee progressing in whatever she does. I am also happy she has the confidence in me to call me if she wants to talk.
  • Meeting the youth and hearing their stories being part of them reaching their goals.
  • I like that it specifically targets youth which are often overlooked in “child protection”.

 

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